John 14

That's The Spirit

"But the helper, The Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, He will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you." --John 14:26

Read: John 14

"Well, that's the spirit!" Someone who changes their attitude towards a task or who chooses optimism over the alternative is often given such affirmation. You've likely said it to someone. Why? Because it's great to watch a friend, coworker, or family member have a change in heart for the better. With that thought, when we as believers feel a stirring inside of us to witness for Christ, or to stress honesty at the office, where does that come from? Or when you and I are comforted during trying times or soothed during periods of loss, who is that we hear?

I thought about that recently when a reader wondered why she can't seem to heed the longing inside her heart to make better decisions about her health. And all I can do is pray with her and offer my own version of encouragement. But if it helps her or you perhaps, try and remember that when a Christian hears that still, small voice inside to be a better steward of their time, or to share financial blessings in church, that's not an accident. It's not karma, the universe or your own set of values. No, the source of the call is far more critical than the call itself. So when you hear, "It's time to take better care of this body God made with his own hands with better food and more exercise" be encouraged to follow through. Why? Well, that's the Spirit.

--Jimmy Peña

Question: What are you being encouraged inside your heart to do this week? Is stewardship of time, money or health among them? As we begin this Monday, jot down the things you know the Holy Spirit is urging you to do. Make a list. Etch on paper what God has etched on your heart. When you do that, it becomes His list. Have a great week everyone.

WORKOUT OF THE WEEK: Total Body 10

One way to constantly challenge yourself, and therefore effect change in your body, is to outdo your previous performance. And to do that doesn’t require a gym — just the willingness to push.

>> Click here to learn how to get stronger and leaner, head to toe, in just 10 minutes.

HE KNEW

September 14, 2011 Read: John 14

Anyone who has seen me has seen the Father.” --John 14:9

When God the creator put the finishing touches on our unique souls, He knew. He knew we'd scrape our shins, disobey parents and upset friends. He knew our kids would reject us, enemies would haunt us and our memory would fail us; and all before losing life's final war with pain. He knew, but that didn't stop Him.

He proceeded to count hairs on heads then fingers and toes. He added color to eyes, dimples on chins and swivels to hips. Why didn't He stop? He knew that what life rejects, Christ accepts. Someday, you and I will see what became of us the day we believed...what the Maker knew.

--J.P.

CEREAL SOLUTIONS What to look for in your breakfast bowl
We all love a good bowl of cereal, whether it's for breakfast or a late-night comfort snack. But not all cereals are created equal. PrayFit VP Eric Velazquez grew up with what he calls an "undiagnosed addiction to Cap'n Crunch," but is now wise to what makes a good, healthy cereal (hint: it's not a prize at the bottom of the box).
PrayFit contributing nutritionist Christie Menna, MS, RD, offers these following label readings to look for when selecting your next box of cereal to augment your healthy lifestyle.
>> 150-200 calories per serving (usually a serving is 1 cup)
>> Less than 6 grams of sugar per serving
>> At least 5 grams of fiber per serving
>> Look for cereals made with whole grains and that contain less than 1.5g saturated fat
Christie's Top Picks: Kashi Go Lean®, Multi-Grain Cheerios®, Kashi Sunshine®, Shredded Wheat®, Honey Bunches of Oats®, Bran Flakes®, Wheaties®
Christie Menna, MS, RD, is a consumer safety officer with the Food and Drug Administration and personal nutrition coach based in Long Island, New York. For more on Christie, visit her at www.activeeatingnutrition.com.

PASSING THE FAITH ALONG

July 21, 2011Read: John 14

“You know the way to the place where I am going.” --John 14:4

Hope nobody’s tired of this week’s marathon theme, because I’m definitely not running out of topics (Ouch!). But I did see something at the race that made me tilt my head and squint my eyes just a bit; something that seemed out of place–a relay team.

I never thought of a marathon as a team sport, but as it turns out, you can run relay-style. Every few minutes or so, I’d see someone run by carrying a baton they’d received from their forerunner, and I realized they’re not in the race alone; for them to be running, there needed to be a hand off.

As believers, it’s neat to think that as we run, we’re collectively carrying a light that Jesus himself lit miles and miles ago. My forerunner was a sweet man named Henry Powell. Because of him, I’m in the race. And although I haven’t always kept pace, because of my ‘preacher man’, I know where I’ll be when I run out of road.

Who was your forerunner?

–J.P.

SO YOU WANNA RUN A MARATHON? (continued)

So if you have managed to stick to the site all week, you will have noticed a developing theme. First, we discussed how beginners should approach their training. Here, we'll speak to the intermediates and our more advanced runners who are looking to make a serious impression on the course.

INTERMEDIATE: If you regularly run 20 to 30 miles a week, and have done so for a year or more, you’re an intermediate. Intermediates also likely do a weekly long run of 8-10 miles and have some experience with tempo runs or intervals. They’ve run 10K races and maybe even finished a half marathon. The rare, elite category of intermediates may have already run a full marathon but are now ready to set more challenging goals for their race times.

>> The Plan: “Long runs are the basis of marathon training, but at this level it’s important to add some intensity to the program,” says anaerobic management coach John Sinclair (www.anaerobic.net). So, you’ll gradually increase the length of the weekly long run to adapt your mind and body to the rigors of running nonstop for several hours. But running 18 to 20 miles at a time isn’t all you need, so you’ll supplement these runs with some higher-effort running twice weekly, including sustained tempo runs at your half-marathon race pace. These promote aerobic strength and efficiency and will help you find that groove you’d like to be in when you run a longer race, according to Sinclair. You’ll also be doing a smattering of speed work. For more specific tips, visit www.runnersworld.com.

ADVANCED: Advanced runners are veterans — those who have been at it for at least three or four years that routinely log 35 to 40 miles a week, with a splash of interval training mixed in for good measure. Advanced runners have likely run the full gamut of races from the 5K up to the marathon. But even elite runners want to score that most prized runner’s achievement — the PR, the absolute fastest 26.2 miles you’re capable of. They may also have ideas of crossing the tape first in a given division.

>> The Plan: “You’ll have to be willing to hit 50 miles a week,” Sinclair says. “For an advanced marathon effort, inadequate miles just won’t cut it.” At this level, your goal is to learn how to maintain a strong, solid pace for several hours. So, along with the standard long runs, you’re going to spend two days a week developing stamina at half marathon, 10K, and 5K race paces. On Thursdays, you’ll be served a marathon goal pace/tempo/cruise combo platter — an extended effort that develops focus, strength, and the capacity to hold a strong pace as fatigue sets in. “Long runs and mileage get you to the finish line,” says Sinclair. “Intensity in your training will get you to the finish line faster.”

Source: Runner’s World

HEARD: “Not only is Jimmy Pena one of my best friends, but whenever I want to get dialed-in for a role or photo shoot, he’s my only call. And I love starting my day at PrayFit.com, building spiritual and physical muscle. A one-of-a-kind concept from the best in the business.”

Mario Lopez, host, EXTRA

>> To hear what others are saying about PrayFit, click here.

COURAGE TO SHOW UP

January 4, 2011Read: John 14

"In my father's house are many rooms..." --John 14:2

I couldn't help but notice today--from Twitter to Facebook to chain emails--the avid exercisers mocking the new faces at the gym. And they all had the same, general theme: "Oh those resolutions. I wonder how long they will last..."

Aren't we glad God doesn't say the same about us? "Oh, here's Jimmy again. Same sin, same confession, I wonder how long this commitment will last."

If it helps, think of the new face at the gym like a visitor at a crowded church on Christmas day. Acknowledge them, welcome them and tell them you'll see them next time. You never know, your words of encouragement might be just what saves their lives. Remember, it took courage for them to show up. Now, it's your turn.

--J.P.

WORKOUT OF THE WEEK: HIIT PARADE

If you tackle both weights and cardio in the same workout, always do your cardio after your weights. Research shows that your resistance training will be hindered if preceded by intense cardio, however, your cardio will not be hindered if preceded by weights. Also, you burn more fat and calories if you follow your weight training with cardio. And remember, volumes of research show that high intensity interval training (HIIT) burns more fat and calories in less time than the slow, long bouts of traditional, steady-state cardio.

So if you need a tough HIIT session to burn some unwanted fat and calories after a tough weight workout, try this quick blast.

Warm-up: 3-5 minutes

Run for 1 minute

Rest for 1 minute

Run for 45 seconds

Rest for 45 seconds

Run for 30 seconds

Rest for 30 seconds

Run for 15 seconds

Rest for 15 seconds

--After 1 minute of rest, repeat the entire sequence backwards, starting with the 15-second intervals.

PASSING THE FAITH ALONG

October 14, 2010Read: John 14 “You know the way to the place where I am going.” --John 14:4

Hope nobody’s tired of this week’s marathon theme, because I’m definitely not running out of topics (Ouch!). But I did see something at the race last week that made me tilt my head and squint my eyes just a bit; something that seemed out of place–a relay team.

I never thought of a marathon as a team sport, but as it turns out, you can run relay-style. Every few minutes or so, I’d see someone run by carrying a baton they’d received from their forerunner, and I realized they’re not in the race alone; for them to be running, there needed to be a hand off.

As believers, it’s neat to think that as we run, we’re collectively carrying a light that Jesus himself lit miles and miles ago. My forerunner was a sweet man named Henry Powell. Because of him, I’m in the race. And although I haven’t always kept pace, because of my ‘preacher man’, I know where I’ll be when I run out of road.

–J.P.

SO YOU WANNA RUN A MARATHON? (continued)

So if you have managed to stick to the site all week, you will have noticed a developing theme. First, we discussed how beginners should approach their training. Here, we'll speak to the intermediates and our more advanced runners who are looking to make a serious impression on the course.

INTERMEDIATE: If you regularly run 20 to 30 miles a week, and have done so for a year or more, you’re an intermediate. Intermediates also likely do a weekly long run of 8-10 miles and have some experience with tempo runs or intervals. They’ve run 10K races and maybe even finished a half marathon. The rare, elite category of intermediates may have already run a full marathon but are now ready to set more challenging goals for their race times.

>> The Plan: “Long runs are the basis of marathon training, but at this level it’s important to add some intensity to the program,” says anaerobic management coach John Sinclair (www.anaerobic.net). So, you’ll gradually increase the length of the weekly long run to adapt your mind and body to the rigors of running nonstop for several hours. But running 18 to 20 miles at a time isn’t all you need, so you’ll supplement these runs with some higher-effort running twice weekly, including sustained tempo runs at your half-marathon race pace. These promote aerobic strength and efficiency and will help you find that groove you’d like to be in when you run a longer race, according to Sinclair. You’ll also be doing a smattering of speed work. For more specific tips, visit www.runnersworld.com.

ADVANCED: Advanced runners are veterans — those who have been at it for at least three or four years that routinely log 35 to 40 miles a week, with a splash of interval training mixed in for good measure. Advanced runners have likely run the full gamut of races from the 5K up to the marathon. But even elite runners want to score that most prized runner’s achievement — the PR, the absolute fastest 26.2 miles you’re capable of. They may also have ideas of crossing the tape first in a given division.

>> The Plan. “You’ll have to be willing to hit 50 miles a week,” Sinclair says. “For an advanced marathon effort, inadequate miles just won’t cut it.” At this level, your goal is to learn how to maintain a strong, solid pace for several hours. So, along with the standard long runs, you’re going to spend two days a week developing stamina at half marathon, 10K, and 5K race paces. On Thursdays, you’ll be served a marathon goal pace/tempo/cruise combo platter — an extended effort that develops focus, strength, and the capacity to hold a strong pace as fatigue sets in. “Long runs and mileage get you to the finish line,” says Sinclair. “Intensity in your training will get you to the finish line faster.”

Source: Runner’s World